Education of a Warrior

Mar 18, 2021 by

Published in the March 18, 2021 edition.

By MARK SARDELLA

The Wakefield Warrior debate of the last several months has certainly been educational, which is only fitting since it involves a school logo.

I, personally, have learned a great many things, the latest as recently as yesterday.

After finishing my annual boiled dinner, I decided to relax with a pint of Guinness and watch last night’s televised panel discussion, where I learned that it’s wrong to take anyone’s culture for granted.

I also learned that mascots are bad, so I’m really glad we don’t have one.

In recent weeks, I’ve learned on social media that the Warrior logo is totally inappropriate from people whose Facebook pages feature photos of them proudly sporting apparel displaying the Warrior logo. 

I’ve learned that not only do I write for the Wakefield Daily Item, but I also run a lucrative sign business where I make windfall profits selling signs and Warrior merchandise. 

And I’ve learned that cancel culture is a myth from people who tag my employers in Facebook posts blowing the whistle on my highly profitable side venture.

I’ve learned that the Warrior logo was not a problem less than three months ago when a new scoreboard featuring the logo was installed at the high school, but in less than 90 days, the logo has become “problematic.”

I’ve learned that civil rights should not be subject to popular vote from those who held a public forum and sent out surveys to gauge popular opinion on something they consider a civil rights issue.

I’ve learned that it’s totally fair when some adults allow teenagers to advance their political causes, but if other adults push back, it’s tantamount to child abuse.

I’ve learned that if you disagree with your neighbors on an issue, rather than having an open and honest discussion with them, it’s preferable to sneak onto their property at night and place anonymous letters in their mailboxes.

I’ve also learned that if I object to people placing anonymous, hectoring letters in my mailbox, I am making a big deal over nothing and need to get over it.

I’ve learned that making a one-sided historical video designed to cast the community you serve in a negative light can sometimes come back and bite you. As Socrates once said, “The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.”

Well, that’s all for today. Learning is exhausting!

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